Posts tagged with 'Startups'
Apr 11, 2008
Be open to feedback, but keep justification off the critical path.
— me, in response to Matt Blodgett

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Mar 12, 2008
When you add a developer to a team you incur at least two fixed costs. The first is in raw currency, the salary you have to pay out. The second is in lines spent—the rate of codebase growth is certain to go up.

Both fixed costs increase your burn rate; only one increase is predictable.

— me

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Mar 9, 2008
A creator needs to acquire only 1000 true fans to make a living.

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Nov 11, 2007
The inclination to design and build software by oneself, from scratch, is the single best indicator of [programming] success.

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Sep 14, 2007
Arrogance without humility is a recipe for high-concept irrelevance; humility without arrogance guarantees unending mediocrity. Figuring out how to be arrogant and humble at once, figuring out when to watch users and when to ignore them for this particular problem, for these users, today, is the problem of the designer.

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Sep 14, 2007
If you’ve got ideas, let them go. They’re probably holding you back from the hard work of actually executing.

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Jul 28, 2007
We knew that Google was going to get better every single day as we worked on it, and we knew that sooner or later everyone was going to try it. So our feeling was that the later you tried it, the better it was for us because we’d make a better impression with better technology. So we were never in a big hurry to get you to use it today. Tomorrow would be better.

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May 2, 2007
Investors are like high school girls:

* They always say what they really care about is the team [you]. Actually what they care most about is your traffic [stock], then what other investors think, then you.

* They are afraid of looking bad.

* They can’t make up their minds.

* They like it when you don’t need them.

* Being turned down by them doesn’t mean much.

* They are emotional. Investment negotiations can easily turn personal. If you offend investors, they’ll leave in a huff. Even after a term sheet, it may be several months to a deal. It’s not uncommon for them to get buyer’s remorse. If they do, they’ll usually seize on some technicality or claim you misled them, rather than admitting they changed their minds.

* They look for founders like the current stars.

* They collude. They are constantly trading little favors. Though a professional investor may have a closer relationship with a founder he invests in than with other investors, his relationship with the founder is only going to last a couple years, whereas his relationship with other firms will last his whole career.

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Apr 21, 2007
You can stand to be flat for awhile when you are way ahead, but when you’re #2 and flat you’re not in a good place.

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