Posts tagged with 'Making'
Aug 18, 2009
Learnable vs Fun

My job as a user experience designer has evolved. While it’s still my responsibility to prevent things from sucking, now it’s also my responsibility to add a little playfulness.

You can’t build playfulness into your designs without experiencing playfulness yourself. Play games and pay attention to what makes them fun.”
Fred Beecher. Trevor Blackwell calls this tinkering.

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May 2, 2007
Building something is easy. Evaluating what you build is hard. Iterate between the two as fast as you can.
— me

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Sep 14, 2007
Arrogance without humility is a recipe for high-concept irrelevance; humility without arrogance guarantees unending mediocrity. Figuring out how to be arrogant and humble at once, figuring out when to watch users and when to ignore them for this particular problem, for these users, today, is the problem of the designer.

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Jan 19, 2008
A programming language is for thinking of programs, not for expressing programs you’ve already thought of. It should be a pencil, not a pen.
Paul Graham on sketching

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Jan 30, 2008
In exploratory programming, it’s as important to avoid premature specification as premature optimization.

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May 1, 2007
A well-designed toy:

* Makes a request. It asks you to “Play with me”. This is why you are compelled to touch it.

* Is fantastically straightforward. The design suggests, “When you pick me up, it’s going to be clear what’s going on.” This is why great toys never have manuals.

* Has hidden potential. A toy is going to hook you with some clever visual, but the real value is something you can not see, but must find.

Toy interfaces are great at turning a terribly complex idea into a simple interface. Giving your users a toy, an interface that is going to invite them to play, is also going to invite them to explore, and when they’re exploring, they’re learning.

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Jul 2, 2007
Schedulers are judicious about schedules, Probers perceptive of options. Schedulers tend to believe that one’s work comes before all else. Probers are much more insistent that the work be enjoyable and to the purpose. By committing themselves to a set agenda, Schedulers tend to stop looking for alternatives and options and so may never know what they’re missing. By keeping their options open Probers are reluctant to commit themselves to schedules and so are inclined to miss deadlines and leave tasks unfinished.

Schedulers tend to be neat and orderly. They like their desk at work to be tidy, and their house picked up. Not that they always manage all of these chores, but they are unhappy when their personal space is a mess, and straightening things up is often near the top of their list. Probers, in contrast, have a much greater tolerance for disorder in their physical environment. They seem absorbed in whatever they’re doing or thinking about at the moment, and are somewhat oblivious to the details of housekeeping.

The two styles are complementary in turning in a job well done: Probers to spot opportunities and lay out alternatives, and Schedulers to be timely and press for closure.

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Jun 26, 2007
In the beginning don’t worry about how you will organize what you write. Write ideas down because writing them down is strictly better than not writing them down.

The only concern is to set things up to make writing easy, and so improve the odds you will sustain the habit.

— me

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Jul 3, 2007
If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.

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Jan 11, 2008
Dreams are meant to be grown out of, not fulfilled. The path to transcendance can pass through the point of fulfillment, yes. But if you’re doing things right, you won’t notice when you pass that point. You’ll be too busy chasing new dreams you came up with along the way.
— me

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